Pearson College UWC was one of the first schools in North America to offer the International Baccalaureate — the most recognized and respected high-school diploma in the world. Pearson College UWC continues to develop innovative IB curriculums, such as the IB Marine Science course and a future new IB Anthropology course on “Indigenous Nations and Settler States in Local and Global Perspectives.”

While the rigorous IB program challenges students academically, Pearson’s IB is about much more than simply scholastic excellence. It includes following a carefully designed program that helps students to develop critical thinking and conflict resolution skills and introduces them to models of leadership based on trust, integrity and responsibility. At its heart, this “radicalizes” the teaching process, turning our educators into highly collaborative coaches and mentors. Once every term, teachers report on students’ progress in academics, activities and residential life to parents, selection committees and the students themselves.

At the end of their second year, students write exams marked by external IB examiners. Pearson students have excelled in these exams, with more than 60% of students since 1974 receiving over 35 points (out of a possible 45) – only 20% to 30% of students worldwide achieve this ranking! Successful students receive an IBC Diploma shortly after they complete their Pearson residency.

CAS: Creativity, Action, Service

At Pearson College UWC, our students learn by doing. The CAS program, mandatory for the completion of the IB diploma, is critical to this concept of learning. So important, that Pearson considers student participation, engagement and initiative in such activities as equally valuable as the time and energy put into academics.

In addition to weekly activities and Extended Home Service, the CAS program consists of at least three Project Weeks over two years. More details on this can be found in the Student Handbook.

Activities

We ask that students pursue at least one activity from each of the CAS categories over two years, committing to every activity for at least one year. Students work with their advisor to create a balanced and challenging program, reflect on their progress at set times throughout the year, then discuss their experiences with their advisor.

Participation in a variety of activities enables students to

  • Develop organizational and leadership skills
  • Meet physical and emotional challenges
  • Develop creative expression
  • Learn a respect for the environment
  • Practice teamwork and cooperation
  • Develop an enduring commitment to the principles of service.

While we offer a wide range of activities, we also encourage students to find, pursue and share what they are passionate about.

Currently, CAS activities may include

Creativity
  • Astronomy
  • Choir
  • Current affairs
  • Dance
  • Newspaper
  • Pottery
Action
  • First Aid
  • Growing food
  • Kayaking
  • Sailing
  • SCUBA diving
  • Wilderness
Service
  • Big Brothers and Big Sisters
  • Environmental stewardship
  • Media
  • Metchosin Community House
  • Special Needs music
  • The Priory (home for the elderly)